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A Thrill Seeker’s Guide to the Balearics

If you think a sojourn on the Balearics is all about poolside drinks and siestas in the sunshine, think again. With its steep sheer cliff faces, narrow caves, and eerie wrecks, there are plenty of activities that will have the hardiest adventurer shaking in their sandals. Dare devils, thrill seekers and speed freaks rejoice: your hang loose yacht charter holiday is about to turn hairy... 

Acrobatic paragliding: for those with a head for heights

If twists, turns, wingovers and deep spirals while flying high above the ground sounds like your idea of a good time, acrobatic paragliding is for you. Take the plunge in tandem and be wowed by hair-raising acrobatics and views across the Tramuntana mountains. Well, as long as you can keep your eyes open, that is! Want proof of yourself pulling 4 G’s? Then gain instant street-cred in the dare-devil community, and opt for a glide that includes photography. 

Cala Varques cliff jumping: not for the faint-hearted

Picture the scene: you’re standing on the edge of Mallorca’s Cala Varques cliff. Behind you lies surefooted safety. In front? Nothing but thin air and a 14m-long drop into the Balearic Sea. Cala Varques is considered one of Mallorca’s best cliff-jumping beaches. Although this east coast beach is tricky to find, thrill-seekers consider the exhilarating jump from this unspoilt beach’ craggy cliffs more than worth the effort it took to venture out here. 

Deep Water Soloing: the Med will catch you if you fall

Whether you’re a climbing newbie or seasoned solo-er, Mallorca has something to suit all climbing abilities. With free-soloing, you have no rope, no harness and no-one around to help if things get sticky. If the thought of this alone makes your heart pound and your hands feel clammy, then DWS is the answer. You can experience exhilarating traverses at water level or challenging overhanging caves, and all with the turquoise Mediterranean Sea as your safety net. 

Out of your depth: exploring underwater caves or wrecks

Seasoned scuba divers know there’s no shortage of great dive sites in Menorca. From Pont d’en Gil to Swiss Cheese and the Bell tower, the island’s caves and caverns are among the most spectacular in the Mediterranean. Then there are countless wrecks to explore. Teeming with aquatic life, wrecks like ‘Francina’, a 1,500-ton merchant ship, and Georgia K, a 2,144-ton cargo ship, offer a chance for discovery and potentially spot something all other divers have missed.  

Slacklining: quite the balancing act

Slacklining, the new take on tightrope walking, uses stretchy tape that bounces and sways under the walker’s weight. You can join the slackline enthusiasts who show off their elastic skills on tape stretched between trees in Palma’s Parc de la Mar. If you’re a skilled slackliner, do as the local experts do (like the guys and girls that comprise the ‘Slackline Mallorca Family’) and perform somersaults and chest bounces over the sea, and at great height.